Featured Data: VotE Survey Results Indicate that Automation Investment is on the Rise

Contributed by Principal Analyst Carl Lehmann

IT Environment automation - clehmann
According to our latest Voice of the Enterprise – Digital Pulse: Budgets & Outlook survey data, 58% of respondents indicated that their current IT environments are either highly or mostly reliant on manual processes. As these businesses move toward digital transformation, these organizations need to be able to tackle new IT projects that will allow them to adapt to digital disruption, adopt new technologies, and meet new business objectives. Automation is a key tool that can allow IT teams to refocus their time on these new projects. Thus, it is sensible that 75% of VotE respondents indicated they expect to increase their automation investment in the next 12 months.

I see this trend as a key driver for digital business and the future of hybrid IT as businesses transform for the future. This will be an important element as I collect my insights for my presentation – “Automation Effectiveness – Are You Prepared to Compete for the Future?” – at the 15th annual Hosting & Cloud Transformation Summit this coming September. Register today to get the insights you will need as you navigate the digital revolution.
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451 Research Shines as a “Go To” Analyst Firm as We Start our 20th Year

Over the past 19 years, 451 Research has worked hard to deliver unique and impactful insight and data about innovation in the technology industry, and we are thankful for the recognition that our clients give us. However, it is always special when your work is recognized by the tech industry and the analyst relations community more broadly. In just the past year, 451 Research and our analysts have been acknowledged as “highly valued” by three different analyst relations communities – further cementing our reputation as one of the technology industry’s premier firms.

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Taking a New Approach to Unstructured Data Management

Written by: Steven Hill - Senior Analyst, Applied Infrastructure and Storage Technologies – 451 Research

Enterprise storage has never been easy. Business depends on data—and all things data begin and end at storage—but the way we handle data in general, and unstructured data in particular, hasn’t really evolved at the same pace as other segments of the IT industry. Sure, we’ve made storage substantially faster and higher capacity, but we haven’t dealt with the real problems of storage growth caused by this increased performance and density; much less the challenges of managing data growth that’s now spanning multiple, hybrid storage environments across the world. The truth is, you can’t control what you can’t see; and as a result, a growing number of businesses are paying a great deal of money to store multiple copies of the same data over and over. Or perhaps even worse, keeping multiple versions of that same data without any references between them at all.

This massive data fragmentation between multiple storage platforms can be one of the major sources of unchecked storage growth; and added to that are the new risks of a “keep everything” approach to data management. Privacy-based initiatives like GDPR in the EU and California’s CCPA-2018 require a complete reevaluation of storage policies across many vertical markets to ensure compliance with these new regulations for securing, protecting, delivering, redacting, anonymizing and authenticating the deletion of data containing personally identifiable information (PII) on demand. While this can be a more manageable problem for database information, it’s a far greater challenge for unstructured data such as documents, video and images that make up a growing majority of enterprise data storage. Without some form of identification this data goes “dark” soon after it leaves the direct control of its creator, and initiatives like GDPR don’t make a distinction between structured and unstructured data.

There can be a number of perfectly good reasons for maintaining similar or matching data sets at multiple locations, such as data protection or increased availability. The real challenge lies in being able to maintain policy-based control of that data regardless of physical location, while at the same time making it available to the right people for the right reasons. Documents and media such as images, audio and video are making up a growing percentage of overall business data, and companies have a vested interest in making continued use of that data. But at the same time, there can be serious legal ramifications for not managing all this data properly that could potentially cost companies millions.

The cloud has changed the IT delivery model forever; and with a hybrid infrastructure, business IT is no longer limited by space, power and capital investment. The decisions regarding workload and data placement can now be based on the best combination of business needs, economics, performance and availability rather than by location alone; but with that freedom comes a need to extend data visibility, governance and policy to data wherever it may be. In this context, the problems of data fragmentation across multiple systems are almost inevitable; so, it really comes down to accepting this as a new challenge and adopting next-generation storage management based on an understanding of what our data is, rather than where it is.

Mass data fragmentation is a problem that existed before the cloud, but fortunately the technology needed to fix this is already available. From an unstructured data perspective, we believe this involves embracing a modern approach that can span data silos for backups, archives, file shares, testing and development data sets and object stores on that bridges on-premises, public cloud and at the edge. A platform-based approach can help to give you visibility into your data, wherever that data resides, and more importantly, can help you maintain greater control by reducing the number of data copies, managing storage costs, and ensuring your data stays in compliance and backed up properly. We also think an ideal solution seamlessly blends legacy, file-based storage with the management flexibility and scalability offered by metadata-based object storage. This requires a fundamental shift in the way we’ve addressed unstructured data management in the past; but it’s a change that offers the benefits of greater data availability and storage-level automation and provides a new set of options for controlling and protecting business data that’s both a major business asset and a potential liability if not handled correctly. 
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Has Integrated Automation conquered the land RPA and AI once battled for?

Contributed by Principal Analyst Carl Lehmann 

Much the way Winter came for the Game of Thrones heroes in the new season (we promise this is the only Game of Thrones reference and we will not share any spoilers), there is talk spreading in the tech industry that Integrated Automation has come to displace tools like robotic process automation (RPA). We certainly don’t disagree, in fact, we predicted back in 2017 that RPA companies would likely not survive as stand-alone vendors.

In this report from April 2017, we predicted that RPA vendors that focused only on automating repetitive tasks, while very welcome in many IT departments in the short term, would be less likely to survive as stand-alone vendors compared to more sophisticated platforms that can call upon various machine-learning (ML) technologies to add contextual awareness and guidance of unstructured interactions toward desired outcomes. Even RPA platforms that can automate based on rules, conditional routing and logical operations, and modify behavior based on their learnings were also considered tech that would likely be subsumed into ML platforms of hyperscale CSPs, IT leviathans and tool kits of larger systems integrators, according to our analysts. In our opinion, it was unlikely RPA would last long as a stand-alone product.

Again in August 2017, our analyst team noted a rising trend with BPM software transforming into a process- and content-oriented application development and runtime platform, which we coined as 'digital automation platform' (DAP). DAPs, as referenced in the report, will emerge as uniform development, integration and runtime environments that enable intelligent process automation (IPA) – a managerial discipline focused on intuitive user experiences, contextual awareness and transparent execution. Much like what others are describing as Integrated Automation today, DAP would require RPA capabilities – to create software 'bots' that automate repetitive human activities in business processes – and AI integration – to expose 'next best guess' activities for application developers and users (process stakeholders) and extract insight – in one solution. In particular, RPA was cited to “likely become a core enabling technology in several DAP vendors' offerings.” 

In short, DAPs and Integrated Automation sound less like the death of RPA and similar technologies, and more like the next logical evolution toward accelerating business operations and making them efficient. Both describe feature-rich development platforms for content- and process-oriented applications, and a method to extract knowledge from automated execution to meet the innovation and operational efficiency needs of enterprises. In fact, our most recent research highlighting this evolution (in this spotlight report, now available for public access) covers why we believe the core tools needed to discover and effect how value and advantage are created include next-generation DAPs, RPA technology, hybrid integration platforms (HIPs), and process mining technologies (PMT) platforms. 451 Research clients can access all Market Insight reports on RPA and DAP and beyond in our Research Dashboard. Don’t have access? Apply for a Trial.

Much the way Winter has come for the Game of Thrones heroes in the new season (we promise this is the only Game of Thrones reference and we will not share any spoilers), there is talk spreading in the tech industry that Integrated Automation has come to displace tools like robotic process automation (RPA). We certainly don’t disagree, in fact we predicted back in 2017 that RPA companies would likely not survive as a stand-alone vendors.

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Global Colocation and Wholesale Datacenter Market to Exceed $54 Billion by 2023

Today, we released projections that the global colocation and wholesale market will exceed $54 billion in revenue by 2023, according to its latest quarterly Datacenter KnowledgeBase (DCKB) – which now tracks more than 6,100 facilities and 1,535 datacenter providers worldwide.
 
451 Research estimates that by the end of 2018, the market had $38.2 billion in revenue. Equinix and Digital Realty remained the global leaders with 9.9% and 6.3% market share, respectively.
 
As for global colocation and wholesale datacenter supply, in terms of net operational square feet, 451 Research analysts expect to see an overall five-year CAGR of 6% by 2023, while global demand is anticipated to be slightly higher at a 7% CAGR.
 
“Cloud provider demand continues to drive strong growth in the top datacenter markets and we expect that to spread beyond the top 20 global markets in the coming years,” said Kelly Morgan, VP of Datacenter Services & Infrastructure. “Some individual markets may see supply growth of 20% or higher, while other slower-growth markets will offset that to provide single-digit growth overall.”
DCKB Global MTDC SQ Supply & Demand
About Datacenter KnowledgeBase
The Datacenter KnowledgeBase (DCKB) database covers more than 6,100 individual datacenters operated by 1,500+ datacenter companies serving North America, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), Asia Pacific (APAC) and Latin America (LATAM). The DCKB tracks colocation and wholesale datacenter facilities globally, and providers insight into facility capacity and capability, investment and expansion opportunities, and future facility builds.
 
This unique database provides the industry’s most authoritative and comprehensive set of datacenter intelligence, covering more than 100 metrics per facility. The 451 Research team gathers data from primary sources including on-site visits, assessments and direct outreach, to validate and collect this data directly from datacenter operators.

Not a current subscriber of the DCKB? Learn more.
 

451 Research, a leading technology analyst and advisory firm, today released projections that the global colocation and wholesale market revenue will exceed $54 billion by 2023, according to its latest quarterly Datacenter KnowledgeBase (DCKB) – which now tracks more than 6,100 datacenters in 1,535 companies worldwide.

 

451 Research estimates that by the end of 2018, the colocation and wholesale market saw $38.2 billion in revenue – 85% of which are currently tracked in the latest Datacenter KnoweldgeBase. Equinix and Digital Realty remained the global leaders with 9.9% and 6.3% share respectively.

 

As for global MTDC supply – in terms of Net Operational Square Footage – 451 Research analysts expect to see an overall five-year CAGR of 6% by 2023, while global demand is anticipated to reach a slightly higher CAGR at 7%.

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