Critical for Black Friday and Cyber Monday: Contextual Commerce is Convenience, Context and Control

Written by: Sheryl Kingstone, Research Vice President & General Manager - VOCUL

The holiday season is right around the corner and so are the notorious shopping holidays of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. According to our Voice of the Connected User Landscape survey, 80% of respondents plan to spend the same as the previous year and the remaining 20% plan to modify their spending. Whether those modifications involve an increase or decrease in spending is difficult to determine based on trends with those respondents being almost evenly split – with 38% expected to spend more than last year and 45% expected to spend less.

With this in mind, we don’t anticipate how much people are spending to be of great interest, but rather where people are buying what they need this holiday season. According to our Global Unified Commerce Forecast, there could be nearly $6 trillion in global digital commerce sales by 2022 up for grabs. That is still a ways away, but digital commerce is still anticipated to dominate holiday spending shopping behavior with 42% of respondents planning to do most of their shopping online rather than in store – a 27% increase in online spending from last year. Additionally, 47% of high-income shoppers will do the majority of their shopping through digital commerce channels.
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IBM acquires Red Hat, but what does that mean?

Key Analyst: Jay Lyman, Principal Analyst, Cloud Native and DevOps

Earlier this week, IBM announced its intent to acquire Red Hat for $33.4 billion, causing quite a buzz across the entire enterprise IT industry. That makes sense, given that the deal represents one of the industry’s biggest software acquisitions to date, IBM’s largest acquisition to date and considering the repercussions for key segments including cloud computing, hybrid cloud, automation and DevOps, containers and Kubernetes.

It feels like the end of an era in addition to the end of the road with Red Hat’s acquisition. This open source software pioneer helped force the enterprise IT industry, including software giants such as Microsoft and VMware, to take open source seriously. IBM acquiring Red Hat marks the beginning of the new age of open source – one populated by established giants and newer open source endeavors such as the dozens of projects that surround and support Kubernetes. That new age is also all about hybrid cloud and cloud-native applications. From a technology M&A standpoint, at $33.4 billion this acquisition marks the largest software transaction we’ve tracked since 2002 – which is impressive and validates the importance and prominence of open source software in the enterprise IT industry.

The deal is also very much about hybrid cloud. According to our Voice of the Enterprise: Cloud Hosting and Managed Services – Budgets and Outlook survey from earlier this year, 58% of respondents cited their organization is pursuing a hybrid strategy. Almost half (46%) of respondents said they expect their businesses to increase vendor spending to spread out more across vendors, either new or existing, as part of their hybrid strategy. IBM and other major public cloud providers like AWS, Microsoft and Google have also broadened their reach in hybrid cloud, but it has been limited mainly to their own clouds integrating with on-premises environments. In IBM’s case, all those public cloud players are already key partners and integrations for Red Hat’s software such as RHEL and OpenShift – expanding IBM’s hybrid cloud reach even further. This deal also follows collaboration and integration that IBM and Red Hat have already accomplished on software such as Linux, OpenStack, and containers and Kubernetes.

Despite how this deal is beneficial for both companies, there is some risk. Upholding Red Hat’s culture could be a challenge during the transition, despite both companies acknowledging its importance. To maintain Red Hat’s strategy and momentum and take full advantage of it, IBM will need to maintain Red Hat’s globally distributed work force with many remote employees rather than to consolidate it. Allowing Red Hat to operate as an independent unit would prove beneficial for everyone.

The deal is also an interesting consolidation of PaaS, given IBM based its former Bluemix PaaS software – later to become its CaaS – on the open source Cloud Foundry software and Red Hat's OpenShift PaaS is based on different open source code. For a deeper analysis on the deal, current clients can check out our deal analysis in our Research Dashboard.
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Introducing 4SIGHT Part 1: Contextual Experience

At our 14th annual Hosting Cloud & Transformation Summit last month, 451 Research CEO Martin McCarthy unveiled 4SIGHT, a new extensive report detailing the major forces of innovation reshaping the digital enterprise landscape. Serving as a framework for our clients to help plan for the future – as well as underpinning our research agenda – the report describes four major categories that will drive the industry over the next decade: Invisible Infrastructure, Pervasive Intelligence, Contextual Experience and Universal Risk. In this post, we provide an overview of our thinking around Contextual Experience.

We define Contextual Experience as the interactions between a customer, worker or citizen and an organization that are augmented by rich sources of real-time information, delivered in the right way at the right time for a friction-free experience.

As technology becomes central to how individuals experience the world around them, it shifts the center of gravity from businesses to individuals in an unprecedented way. Business is being redefined from a transactional relationship between people into a more nuanced, tangled relationship between humans and the automated systems and devices they use to engage with the world. With it, the balance of power between organizations and their customers changes dramatically across virtually all industries. Prices and products are no longer enough to influence decisions. Instead, customers place a higher value on experiences. Employees will also value experiences and will need more motivation than compensation, benefits and an appealing corporate mission statement from their workplace.

With the explosion in new types of physical, digital and blended experiences, the battleground is moving beyond businesses providing ‘omni-channel’ strategies. Users will soon be expecting intelligent, immersive, pervasive and seamless experiences, all personalized to their own changing context.

For example, think about your relationship with your smartphone and how you use it. We found that 80% of online purchases in 2017 were influenced by mobile and that the average person will have more conversations with machine-learning-enabled bots than with other humans each day within a decade. It will behoove organizations to work toward delivering such contextual experiences to their consumers to avoid being passed over in the future.

From an enterprise perspective, successful organizations will adapt their technology stacks and utilize new inputs to create the Liquid Enterprise – enabling them to organize more fluidly around their customers and their workers. Businesses that can quickly and easily marshal and manage human resources to organize responsively around users’ ever-changing requirements will be on top in the future.

In short, technology will become central to how individuals experience the world around them, and enterprises will be expected to cater to the users’ preferred ways of consuming information, engaging the brand and completing work. We are starting to see these changes today, but these developments will increase over the next decade.

There is much more to learn about the long-term effects and predictions within the 4SIGHT report. Current customers can contact their sales rep; otherwise, apply for a trial to learn more.
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