Prepping for HCTS – Q&A with Research Vice President Melanie Posey

Continuing with our “Prepping for HCTS – Q&A” series, I took a minute to catch up with Research Vice President Melanie Posey. Melanie has spoken at HCTS a number of times and we look forward to her taking the stage once again.

Q: What did you discuss last year?

A: Last year I talked about how important it is for service providers to “partner for success” in the digital era.

Q: What was your biggest take away from last year’s HCTS?

A: My biggest takeaway from HCTS last year was that cloud is now mainstream IT – it’s time for service providers to start thinking about how they work with the hyperscale providers going forward and the types of 1+1=3 value propositions will be most compelling to customers.

Q: What will you be discussing in this session?

A: We’ll be discussing the ways in which the dynamics of enterprise IT will evolve in an era where public clouds are the increasingly dominant IT platform. This session will also look at the changes in buying behavior, skills requirements, and IT organizational structure being brought about by the imperatives of digital transformation.

Q: Why should HCTS attendees find this session valuable/what can they hope to gain? Figure 1
A: According to VoTE survey respondents, 86% of organizations agree that digital technology has a significant or moderate impact on their industries, but only 39% have formal strategies in place to mitigate the impact of it (Figure 1). In this session, attendees will get a glimpse of what lies ahead in the “post-cloud” digital transformation-focused future: where partnering is a requirement (and not an option) and where IT vendors’ success depends largely on their ability to help customers navigate the design, implementation, and operations management challenges in the journey toward business-centric IT modernization.

Q: Why are you excited to attend this year’s HCTS? 

A: I’m excited about HCTS this year because we’re at a turning point in the IT industry. As business and IT become ever more aligned, we’re seeing a democratization of IT within organizations. We have our ideas on how this is changing things in the IT space – we’re interested in hearing about attendees’ experiences, too!

Join Melanie at HCTS 2018 to hear her discuss the future of enterprise IT in a public cloud dominate world. HCTS will be held at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, September 24-26. Keep an eye out for the other posts in our ongoing series, including the previous Q&A with Matt Aslett.  

Figure 1 is from Voice of the Enterprise (VoTE) – Digital Pulse: Budgets & Outlook 2017

 

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Tech M&A Mid-Year Review – Big Spenders Return and IPOs Set Records

In this webinar, hear about the current boom in Tech M&A spending and what it may mean for the rest of 2018. Spending on tech acquisitions in the first half of this year has surged -- 70% higher than the same period last year. Despite facing sharp competition from non-tech acquirers and private equity buyers, enterprise buyers are back in the game and on pace to do more tech deals this year than any year in history. On top of that, the other exit for startups is busy, too, with the pace of enterprise technology IPOs hitting a post-recession record.

Join Brenon Daly, who leads 451 Research’s M&A practice, and Scott Denne, a senior M&A analyst, for an update on the first half of 2018 and what we expect to shape dealflow for the rest of the year. They’ll highlight trends in deal activity with insight from 451 Research analysts as well as 451 Research’s M&A KnowledgeBase, the industry’s only tech-focused M&A database, and:

  • Take a look at trends in both M&A activity and valuations.
  • Discuss implications for buyers, sellers and investors.
  • Dissect this year’s IPO boom and forecast which startups might be looking to join the parade of new offerings. 
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IoT = IT + OT: Solving the Enterprise IoT Equation

The Internet of Things (IoT) represents an enormous opportunity for technology vendors. But selling IoT outcomes – in particular into industries that have deep industrial or operational technology (OT) roots – is a fundamental departure from the traditional IT sale.

Vendors face a more complex solution sale that goes beyond the usual IT buyer and involves multiple stakeholders that sit at the crossroads of IT, OT and strategic business agendas. For the first time ever, 451 Research launched a Voice of the Enterprise (VoTE) IoT: OT Stakeholder Perspective survey in addition to the quarterly VotE IoT: survey of IT decision-makers. Together, these two surveys provide complementary insights and guidance into the IT and OT view of enterprise IoT deployments, budgets, spending, technology priorities, vendor choices and more.

Join 451 Research’s Rich Karpinski, Research Director for Voice of the Enterprise – IoT, to see highlights from this first-ever VotE IoT: OT Stakeholder Perspective survey and learn about:

• How to best work with OT and IT buyers
• The key OT-heavy verticals driving industrial IoT, including manufacturing, utilities, transportation, oil and gas and smart cities
• How to target the very specific OT-centric use cases that are driving IoT deployments and spending in those verticals today – and in the future
• How to position IoT products and services effectively with OT decision-makers – what they want and need from both their IT- and OT-centric vendors
• Where and how OT and IT are collaborating most effectively on IoT – and where and why they are in active conflict (and how you can help)

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Business Software Spending Outlook: Strongest Outlook in Six Years

The latest corporate software survey points to a jolt of momentum going forward, with software spending showing more strength than in any other business survey of the past six years.

The January 11-31 survey finds spending increases across nearly all software categories – led by upticks for BI, Digital Marketing, B2B and CRM.

A total of 904 respondents from 451 Research’s Leading Indicator panel who are involved with software purchasing in their company participated in the survey, which also looked at digital marketing technology trends.

Excerpt of full report:

Software Spending Outlook: Next 90 Days. A total of 18% of corporate respondents say their company will spend more on software over the next 90 days ‚Äì up 5 points from the previous survey in October.  Only 11% say less ‚Äì which is also 5 points improved over previously.

soft spend 2.27.17
As the above chart shows, this the first business software spending improvement in three quarters, and the 10 point upswing is tied with January 2014 as the largest quarterly increase of the past six years.

Digital Marketing Technology Vendors. Microsoft (30%) remains the leading vendor companies say they are using (or plan to use) for digital marketing technology – up 7 points from January 2016. Salesforce (27%; down 2 points) comes in second, closely followed by Adobe (26%; up 7 points).

dig mkt 2.27.17
Report details also include:
• Overall Software Spending
• Capital Budget Trends
• Reasons Behind Spending
• Individual Software Categories, including CRM, BI, B2B, Digital Marketing Technology, Database, and Security, among others
• Digital Marketing Technology

Learn more about Voice of the Connected User Landscape here.
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When things attack: Mirai and the Dyn DDoS attack reveal a disturbing future

The October 21 attacks that knocked some of the internet's most-recognized brands offline in the largest recorded distributed denial of service to date reveal how little the world has taken seriously the threat of poorly secured consumer IoT. Will we be ready for what may come next?

The 451 Take

These attacks have only just begun to illustrate the level of exposure the world faces from what so far appears to be largely SMB products made for the Internet of Things. Indeed, this narrow focus says much about the potential scale of risk beyond the cameras and DVRs largely targeted in this case. While virtually everyone weighing in on the discussion agrees that something must be done to head off an even worse scenario, what remedies make the most sense? There are needs at virtually every level of IoT architecture, from the software and functionality built into devices to the networks and platforms that interconnect IoT's many moving parts. The recent attacks illustrate how easily poorly secured IoT can be made a platform for attacking the fundamental underpinnings of the internet that keep the entire digital world functioning. So far, most of the discussion around IoT security has revolved around protecting IoT itself, with considerable investment already having gone into securing industrial IoT, particularly in sectors where safety is a primary concern. The threat that vulnerable IoT poses in and to the larger world has been seriously underserved. The range of solutions proposed – from adopting the analog of building codes for software and hardware to sweeping regulation, and the inevitable arm wrestling each presents – makes it clear that resolving these vulnerabilities will not be easy. What concerns us most is that, as so often happens with security, it will take an incident of serious proportions to bring any real progress to a head. It would be wise for the industry to do what it can to address this before governments take a stab at it.

Read the full analysis by 451 Research analysts here.
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