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  • An autumn chill on Wall Street

    This time of year has always been a bit unnerving for investors, and for good reason. Late October has seen some of the most dramatic declines on Wall Street, including the granddaddy of them all, the Great Crash of 1929. Additionally, earlier this week marked the 30th anniversary of Black Monday. These days, with shares trading at all-time highs, investors have indicated a substantial erosion of confidence in the stock market's future direction.

  • MongoDB maintains in IPO

    Despite a well-received IPO, MongoDB's valuation basically flatlined from the private market to the public market. The open source NoSQL database provider priced shares at $24 each and jumped in mid-Thursday trading to about $30. The 25% pop on the Nasdaq basically brought MongoDB shares back to the price where the company sold them to crossover investors in late 2014.

    Data Platforms & Analytics

  • A pivot turns into a face-plant

    With its attempt at a pivot having turned into face-plant, Synchronoss will unwind its massive, bet-the-company acquisition of Intralinks by divesting the collaboration software vendor to PE firm Siris Capital Group. The buyout shop will pay about $1bn for Intralinks, which Synchross acquired last December for $821m. The divestiture ends a pairing that faced skepticism from the very start, with Synchross shares having lost two-thirds of their value since the deal was announced.

    Data Platforms & Analytics Workforce Productivity & Compliance

  • Stuck startups

    Startups are increasingly stuck. The well-worn path to riches - selling to an established tech giant - isn't providing nearly as many exits as it once did. In fact, based on our calculations, 2017 will see roughly 100 fewer exits for VC-backed companies than any year over the past half-decade. This current crimp in startup deal flow, which is costing billions of dollars in VC distributions, could have implications well beyond Silicon Valley.

  • Survey: Steady as she goes for tech M&A

    Undeterred by the recent slowdown in M&A activity, tech acquirers have largely left their bullish forecast for dealmaking unchanged. For the third consecutive time, essentially half of the respondents to the semiannual M&A Leaders' Survey from 451 Research and Morrison & Foerster indicated that they expected an acceleration in acquisition activity. The results lined up very closely with the sentiment from both the year-ago survey as well as our previous survey in April.

  • Survey: Tech M&A forecast holds, even as deals decline

    Undeterred by the recent slowdown in M&A activity, tech acquirers have largely left their bullish forecast for dealmaking unchanged. For the third consecutive time, essentially half of the respondents to the semi-annual M&A Leaders' Survey from 451 Research and Morrison & Foerster indicated that they expected an acceleration in acquisition activity. The 51% that forecast a pickup over the next year in M&A in our most-recent edition is more than twice the 19% that projected a decline.

  • Barely a ripple in the pool of tech buyers

    New companies are constantly wading into the tech buying pool. As welcome as those new entrants are, however, their arrival has barely caused a ripple in the overall tech M&A market. Unconventional buyers have come up far short in offsetting the dealmaking absence of the mainstay tech acquirers. The result? This year is on track for the lowest overall tech M&A volume in four years.

  • ForeScout detected filing for an IPO

    The path to an IPO hasn't been a particularly well-trodden one for security vendors. ForeScout, founded in 2000 with a network security appliance, has officially filed its S-1 after quietly exploring IPO options for several months. Looking ahead to its debut, we don't expect the company to stumble when it steps onto Wall Street.

    Information Security

  • Q3 tech M&A spending tops the charts, but is it a one-hit wonder?

    Boosted by a September surge, spending on global tech acquisitions in the just-completed Q3 soared to the highest quarterly total of 2017. In fact, the $119bn worth of tech deals announced during the July-September period only slightly trailed the total amount spent during the first six months of 2017. However, given that many of the biggest prints appear to be one-time transactions, there's some question about the sustainability of the surge.

  • A pause in the big 'SaaS grab'

    After years of trying to leap directly to the cloud through blockbuster acquisitions, major software vendors have been taking a more step-by-step approach lately. That's shown up clearly in the recent M&A spending by Oracle and SAP. The duo has announced almost a dozen SaaS purchases valued at more than $1bn. However, not one of those deals has come in the past 14 months, as the two companies have largely focused on the implications of their earlier 'SaaS grab.'

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